Chicken Bone Broth

Soup

Equipment Needed: Cook Hob

Time Needed: all day

✓ Gluten Free

✓ Dairy Free

✓ Egg Free

✓ Nut Free

Chicken stock made from homemade bone broth is an excellent source of nutrients. With just a little prep time, the broth nearly makes itself. Excellent ingredients are available right at your local wet market.

Ingredients

6 chicken feet rinsed

4 chicken necks

1-2 chicken frames

1 large onion quartered

2-3 stalks celery halved

1-2 large carrots quartered

2 tbsp apple cider vinegar

4 quarts water

What you need to know

Why do I need to add vinegar? The apple cider vinegar added in the beginning of the recipe helps leach the nutrients out of the bones and into the broth.
How hard should I boil it? A rolling boil is not recommended. Bring the pot to an initial boil and turn the heat down to a gentle simmer. To much boiling will break down the collagen in the bones or chicken feet. A gentle simmer will help bring the collagen into the broth.
A really good stock will turn gelatinous when chilled. It your cooled broth has become one solid lump after a night in the fridge, you have done a good job. No worries, the broth will promptly liquify again with just a little warmth.
Chicken Noodle Soup: Add diced carrots, celery, cooked diced chicken meat and noodles to 2-3 quarts of homemade chicken stock.
Stock Cubes: pour cooled stock into an ice cube tray and freeze. Store cubes in zip lock bag in freezer and use when ever you need a few tablespoons of stock.

Instructions

  1. In a large stock pot, combine chicken parts and fill with water. Add apple cider vinegar and let soak for an hour. Add the vegetables, and turn up the heat.
  2. Once simmering, skim off any foam that rises to the top of the water.
  3. Continue to simmer on low for 6 – 12 hours. Add water as necessary during the cooking time. Do not let the stock come to a full boil. In the last hour, let the stock reduce in volume by about one third.
  4. Let stock cool slightly and strain through a sturdy colander into a clean pot or bowl. Mash the vegetables in the stainer and restrain the broth between the two pots several times. Discard the mashed up vegetables and chicken bones. Salt to taste.
  5. The stock can be used immediately for another recipe or cooled and refrigerated or frozen for another day.
  6. If you wish to remove some or all of the fat, chill in the refrigerator overnight until the fat hardens and can be easily removed.
 

Chicken Broth Soup Stock

Soup stock made from homemade bone broth is an excellent source of nutrients. With just a little prep time, the broth nearly makes itself. Excellent ingredients are available right at your local wet market.

Ingredients

Chicken Stock

  • 6 chicken feet rinsed
  • 4 chicken necks
  • 1-2 chicken frames
  • 1 large onion quartered
  • 2-3 stalks celery halved
  • 1-2 large carrots quartered
  • 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 4 quarts water

Instructions

Chicken Stock

  • In a large stock pot, combine chicken parts and fill with water. Add apple cider vinegar and let soak for an hour. Add the vegetables, and turn up the heat.
  • Once simmering, skim off any foam that rises to the top of the water.
  • Continue to simmer on low for 6 – 12 hours. Add water as necessary during the cooking time. Do not let the stock come to a full boil. In the last hour, let the stock reduce in volume by about one third.
  • Let stock cool slightly and strain through a sturdy colander into a clean pot or bowl. Mash the vegetables in the stainer and restrain the broth between the two pots several times. Discard the mashed up vegetables and chicken bones. Salt to taste.
  • The stock can be used immediately for another recipe or cooled and refrigerated or frozen for another day.
  • If you wish to remove some or all of the fat, chill in the refrigerator overnight until the fat hardens and can be easily removed.

Notes

Why do I need to add vinegar?  The apple cider vinegar added in the beginning of the recipe helps leach the nutrients out of the bones and into the broth.
How hard should I boil it?  A rolling boil is not recommended.  Bring the pot to an initial boil and turn the heat down to a gentle simmer.  To much boiling will break down the collagen in the bones or chicken feet.  A gentle simmer will help bring the collagen into the broth.
A really good stock will turn gelatinous when chilled.  It your cooled broth has become one solid lump after a night in the fridge, you have done a good job.  No worries, the broth will promptly liquify again with just a little warmth.